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Category:
Academic Affairs


Responsible Office:

Procedure Title:
Teacher Preparation Programs, Guidelines for the Implementation of SUNY's

Document Number:
1901

Effective Date:
January 08, 2003


This procedure item applies to:
Community Colleges
State-Operated Campuses
Statutory Colleges

Table of Contents
Summary

Process
Forms
Related Procedures
Other Related Information
Authority
History
Appendices

Summary
This procedure is for the implementation of the State University of New York (University) Teacher Preparation Programs policy. It is to assist campuses in the planning of teacher education programs, to make clear the expectations for current programs and to make explicit operative criteria in the system-level review of academic program proposals leading to New York State teacher certification. This procedure follows the organization and objectives of A New Vision in Teacher Education (June 2001). The New Vision agenda is driven by three primary objectives: assuring excellent preparation of effective teachers; addressing the state’s need for excellent teachers; and assuring continuous assessment and improvement of the University’s teacher education programs.

Process

      The following sections reflect the objectives articulated in A New Vision in Teacher Education and include responsibility, compliance and reporting timelines, criteria for program proposal review and guidance on proposal submission. 

I.    Excellent Preparation of Effective Teachers 

A.   Students preparing to teach secondary/adolescence 7-12 or specialized subjects K-12 (i.e., English, Biology, Spanish, Music, etc.) will major in the relevant discipline, completing all required courses for the major. Additional courses in the major may be specifically designated for students preparing to teach.

Responsibility:
Campus.

Time frame:
Ongoing.

Note:
Applies to baccalaureate programs leading to the first or initial certificate. Campuses with graduate programs preparing novice teachers leading to the initial certificate (e.g., Biology 7-12 MAT) will assure appropriate content preparation prior to formal admission to the graduate program.

B.   Students preparing to teach in the elementary grades (B-2, 1-6) will complete an approved major or concentration directly related to the elementary curriculum (i.e., English, mathematics, etc.) of at least 30 credits with at least 18 credits at the upper division level.

Responsibility:
Campus.

Time frame:
Ongoing.

Note:
Applies to baccalaureate programs leading to the first or initial certificate. Interdisciplinary majors or concentrations for B-2 and l-6 certification programs at the baccalaureate level (e.g., environmental studies) are appropriate when other provisions (content directly related to the elementary curriculum, 30 credit total and 18 upper level credits) have been met. In special cases, a sophomore level course may count toward the 18 credit upper level requirement when a student completes a major/concentration sequence in the content area. Campuses with graduate programs preparing novice teachers leading to the initial certificate (e.g., Childhood Education Master’s of Science in Teaching (MST)) will assure appropriate content preparation prior to formal admission to the graduate program.

C.   The University will convene a series of forums involving the University faculty and administrators on best practices in teacher preparation.

Responsibility:
System provost.

Time frame:
Ongoing.

Note:
System-wide forums, like the Mathematics Education Task Force, will be convened by system administration in collaboration with campuses.

D.   Students will complete not less than 100 hours of clinical or field experience in a school classroom before and exclusive of time spent in student teaching.

Responsibility:
Campus.

Time frame:
Ongoing.

Note:
Applies to baccalaureate and graduate programs leading to the first or initial certificate. Campuses with graduate programs preparing novice teachers may, by determination of the faculty, allow hours of classroom experience prior to formal admission to the graduate program to be counted toward the total.

E.   Student teaching will consist of a minimum of 75 days in classrooms and schools (with 90 days being desirable) in two separate experiences, at least one of which is in a high-need school.

Responsibility:
Campus and system administration working with school districts and the State Education Department.

Time frame:
Ongoing.

Note:
Applies to baccalaureate and graduate programs leading to the first or initial certificate. The 75 day minimum may include time spent in classrooms and schools when classes are not in session, e.g., staff development and superintendent days. For practical reasons, campuses may wish to consider extending these experiences beyond a single semester while maintaining a commitment to experiences in high-need schools. High need school districts are listed in the July 2004 report, New York: The State of Learning (Chapter 655 Report); see the districts with need/resource capacity (N/RC) code 1 through 4.

F.   Experienced clinical faculty will supervise all field experiences.

Responsibility:
Campus with support of system administration.

Time frame:
Ongoing.

Note:
Experienced clinical faculty may include, in addition to full-time faculty, qualified former K-12 teachers or school administrators. The campus is responsible for integrating these experienced adjunct or part-time faculty with the campus faculty and academic community.

G.   The University campuses will design integrated programs for qualified students that provide continuity from entry as freshmen through the Master’s degree. Coursework credited toward the Master’s degree will sustain balance among study in the subject matter to be taught, discipline-specific pedagogy, and clinical experience.

Responsibility:
Campus in consultation with system administration.

Time frame:
Ongoing.

Note:
Integrated or combined degree programs will vary by campus, discipline, and certification area; graduate course work will depend on the program objective. For example, an integrated or combined program leading to initial/professional certification, English 7-12 Bachelor’s of Art/English Master’s of Art need not contain any pedagogy in the graduate component, whereas English Bachelor’s of Art/English Master’s of Art in Teaching must. System administration will give such campus proposals priority review.

H.   The University will promote, both within the system and with state officials, systematic involvement and recognition of the professional contributions of classroom teachers and schools in educating new teachers. System and campus leaders will engage State Education Department officials and local school administrators in discussion. The University will increase the stipend for cooperating classroom teachers who work with student teachers and other non-monetary incentives will be sought. Incentives will also be sought for cooperating teachers who supervise pre-student teaching experiences. The University teacher education faculty, in collaboration with schools and teachers, will devise methods of evaluating the contributions of classroom teachers in educating teachers.

Responsibility:
System administration for stipends and campus leaders for non-monetary incentives.

Time frame:
Ongoing.

Note:
System administration will continue to engage state and regional officials―as has been done with the Commissioner of Education, New York City public school leaders, and state regional superintendents―to address the importance of school-higher education collaboration in educating novice teachers. Increasing the recognition of supervising teachers by monetary and non-monetary incentives remains a high priority.

A.   A group of two- and four-year college faculty and administrators will be convened to design an academic program at two-year campuses for qualified students pursuing teacher education programs. The program would be accepted by senior campuses as fulfillment of a portion of the teacher preparation curriculum. The two-year curriculum will be sensitive to accreditation issues and include the University General Education Requirements, introductory education courses and prerequisites for teacher education programs, and early practical experience or observationin a school classroom.

Responsibility:
System provost to convene the group; campuses to provide advisement and articulation.

Time frame:
Ongoing.

Note:
The Working Group on Teacher Education was convened in fall 2001 and presented its recommendations to the system provost in January 2003. Continuing support for the Working Group and an implementation protocol for the initiative will be provided. Campuses are encouraged to collaborate and work toward the universal transfer template in the interest of well-prepared novice teachers to address the state’s needs.

B.   Two-year and baccalaureate colleges will negotiate revised and jointly registered programs to bring more qualified two-year students into teacher education programs. Two-year and baccalaureate colleges will collaborate to assure expert counseling and advisement of qualified two-year college students pursuing teaching certification programs.

Responsibility:
Pairs of collaborating campuses.

Time frame:
Joint program revision and development ongoing.

Note:
Existing joint programs are being revised and new programs are being developed, and will continue to receive priority review in the office of the provost/program review and planning group.
Where articulation agreements are preferred to jointly registered programs, senior campuses will engage two-year colleges in changes in certification programs affecting successful transfer and time to degree.

C.   Partnerships of two-year and four-year campuses will be organized to assure broad geographic access to the University teacher preparation programs for place-bound students.

Responsibility:
System provost will survey the need and convene groups of collaborating campuses.

Time frame:
Ongoing.

Note:
Some partnerships exist; some are planned with implementation dependent on resource availability.

D.   System administration will work with individual campuses or groups of campuses to develop alternative certification programs for candidates who hold a baccalaureate degree and demonstrate competence in an appropriate content field. Campuses will obtain formal agreements with school districts. Creation of alternative certification programs will target high-need school districts and subject areas, and may also serve geographic areas without access to the University teacher certification programs.

Responsibility:
Campuses working with system administration.

Time frame:
Development began June 2001. Ongoing.

Note:
Proposals for alternative certification programs will continue to receive priority review by the office of the provost/program review and planning group.

E.   The University will advocate expansion of government incentive programs, such as New York's Teachers of Tomorrow, to include undergraduates who pursue high-need teaching credentials. Campuses will undertake aggressive recruitment of students to pursue certification in high-need subjects. Campuses will pursue private funding for scholarships and incentives to address teacher shortages in high-need subjects.

Responsibility:
System administration (system provost, enrollment management, Research Foundation) and campus.

Time frame:
Began 2001. Ongoing.

Note:
Many campuses have established programs to attract increasing enrollments in the high-need subjects such as mathematics, science, special education and languages other than English.

F.    The University will establish an Urban Teacher Education Center in New York City to increase the number of the University-educated teachers who take positions in the city’s schools and to serve as a laboratory for enhancing the effectiveness of teacher preparation for urban school. The University will promote increased service to the urban schools in other cities, such as Buffalo, Rochester, and Syracuse and others, including the possible establishment of teacher education centers in these cities.

Responsibility:
For State University of New York Urban Teacher Education Center (SUTEC), system provost; for other cities, system provost with campus leaders.

Time frame:
Began June 2001. Ongoing.

Note:
SUTEC opened in October 2001 and began immediately to serve campus programs by arranging field work, especially student teaching and summer experiences, in the public schools. It is our expectation that campuses will make use of SUTEC for coordinating supervision of student teaching experiences as well as for supplementary enrichment opportunities in the City.

III.    Continuous Assessment and Improvement of Teacher Preparation


Forms

There are no forms relevant to this procedure.


Related Procedures

There are no related procedures relevant to this procedure.


Other Related Information

Teacher Preparation Programs

High need school districts are listed in the July 2004 report, New York: The State of Learning (Chapter 655 Report); see the districts with need/resource capacity (N/RC) code 1 through 4.

Teacher Education Transfer Template


Authority

The following link to FindLaw's New York State Laws is provided for users' convenience; it is not the official site for the State of New York laws. 
NYS Education Law §355 (Powers and duties of trustees - personnel functions.)


In case of questions, readers are advised to refer to the New York State Legislature site for the menu of 
New York State Consolidated.


Board of Trustees Policies - University Officers (8 NYCRR Part 328)


History

Memorandum to presidents from the office of the provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs dated January 8, 2003 regarding policy guidelines for the implementation of A New Vision in Teacher Education.

Chancellor King made teacher preparation a policy priority for the University of New York in June 2001 by creating an action agenda, entitled A New Vision in Teacher Education, based in large part on recommendations of the Advisory Council on Teacher Education. Charged with implementing the policy, the office of academic affairs surveyed all current baccalaureate certification programs, conducted a questionnaire to determine the status of related issues, and wrote to presidents of 11 University campuses to advise on particular elements in New Vision needing further attention by faculty and academic administrators.


Appendices

Appendix A - Report of the Provost's Advisory Council on Teacher Education

Appendix B - Initial Report: Provost's Mathematics Education Task Force

Appendix C - A New Vision in Teacher Education: Agenda for Change in SUNY's Teacher Preparation Programs