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Category:
Financial
Student Affairs



Responsible Office:

Policy Title:
Fees, Rentals, and Other Charges

Document Number:
7804

Effective Date:
September 20, 2011


This policy item applies to:
State-Operated Campuses
Table of Contents
Summary

Policy
Definitions
Other Related Information
Procedures
Forms
Authority
History
Appendices


Summary

This policy outlines State University of New York (University) fees, rentals and other charges as established by the State University of New York Board of Trustees, the chancellor or designee, and campus administration. This policy applies to all State-operated campuses within the University system.

In the event that a fee is imposed upon students without following the guidelines set forth within this policy, funds collected shall be refunded to the payee in full upon request made to the campus involved or by directive from System Administration. Requests for refunds must be made within three years of the collection of the fee. This refund provision is effective as of September 2011. Other refund provisions may also apply.


Policy

Fees, Rentals, and Other Charges

There are three levels of authority for establishing University charges:

Board of Trustees Authorized Fees and Charges

   I. The Board of Trustees establishes charges subject to certain statutory limitations and approves other University-wide fees that are to be paid by students as a condition of attendance. The Board's authorization may take the form of imposing a fee, with or without a ceiling level, requiring either a University-wide charge to be established or individual campus rates to be approved by the chancellor or designee. The Board has established charges and fees regarding:

A. Tuition – rates as adopted per Board resolution and through the rulemaking process.  See policy document 7815 – Tuition Schedule

B. Student Activity Fees – a maximum amount adopted as per Board of Trustee policy in consultation with the student assembly to fund activities of the campus student government and recognized student organizations.  See policy document 3901 – Student Activity Fees - Mandatory

C. Health Insurance Fee for International Exchange, Research and Study Programs – See policy document 3750 – Health Insurance Coverage for International Exchange, Research & Study Programs.

Additional guidelines are provided for billing and collecting the health insurance fee:

1. Annual notification of the changes in this fee will be made by the university office of financial services.

2. The campus shall collect from each participant the health insurance fee and deposit in a timely manner the receipts of such fee into an Income Fund Reimbursable (IFR) account established for this program.

D. Admissions Deposits

Each campus will require an admission deposit in accordance with the rate schedule as provided under policy document 7801 - Pre-Admission Deposits – Undergraduate Program, policy document 7807 – Pre-Admission Deposit Refunds for Undergraduate Programs and policy document 7802 - Pre-admissions Deposits  – Graduate Programs.

II. The Board of Trustees adopted fee policy guidelines that provided guidance with respect to fee approval and the level and degree of communication, participation and involvement in the fee setting process by all campus constituencies.

Broad-based Fees – General Guidelines

1. Campuses are required to submit a five-year broad-based fee plan, including proposals to charge new fees and adjust existing fees.  Plans may include one-time adjustments and or multi-year adjustments to campus fees.

2. Broad-based fees are generally charged to all enrolled students to finance discrete activities that benefit the student body, excluding those activities that are part of the core instructional program. Broad-based fees include but are not limited to the College Fee, Academic Excellence and Success Fee, Student Health Services Fee, Intercollegiate Athletics Fee, Technology Fee, and the Transportation Fee.

3. All broad-based fees require the approval of the chancellor's designee. Any new broad-based fee requests must explicitly state the purpose of the fee and the campus must assure that the moneys generated from the fee are used solely for such purpose. With the exception of the College Fee, broad-based fee revenue must be recorded within separate and distinct accounts.

4. Broad-based fee revenue may be used for personnel and other than personnel service (OTPS) expenditures, unless excluded by individual fee policies.  Fee revenue may not be pledged or used to pay debt service.

5. Accumulations of broad-based fee revenue must conform to the university’s policy on financial reserves.  Any proposed fee increase must consider any accumulated reserve amounts.

6.   Broad-based fee increases must be sensitive to student financial access. Annual broad-based fee increases should be no greater than the Higher Education Price Index (HEPI) unless there is a compelling case. Compelling reasons for such an increase may include, but are not limited to expansion of critical student services, technology improvements, mandatory collective bargaining costs that exceed the current HEPI index or an extraordinary increase in fringe benefits.

7.   Each campus must adopt a comprehensive broad-based fee policy that ensures student involvement in the decision-making process, adequate communication of fee actions.  Student involvement in the broad-based fee decision-making process should be participatory, provide a forum for discussion and an opportunity for questions and answers, or other methods where appropriate.

8. Campuses must adopt individual policies for fee waivers and refunds, which address part-time, non-traditional, on-line and off-site students fairly.  Although authority for developing a refund policy is delegated to the campuses, it is recommended that individual campus fee refund policies follow the existing tuition refund schedule.   Reference to the location of the individual campus fee waiver and refund policy must be included with student invoices and easily accessible on the campus web-site.

9. Broad-based fee waivers or partial waivers are permissible for unique educational settings and circumstances as determined by the campus president or designee.  Such provisions may be made for distance learning, high school, and executive type programs (i.e., Early College High School and College in the High School programs).

10. Campuses may charge mandatory broad-based fees during summer and winter sessions provided services supported by fee revenue are available at that time.  Fees should be pro-rated based on credit hours taken or the length of an abbreviated term and must be approved by the chancellor’s designee.

11. Campus broad-based fee policy documents must be filed annually with the chancellor's designee to be used for "Best Practices, especially with regard to student consultation.

12. Student bills may reflect a single comprehensive fee that "bundles" some or all of the broad-based fees but a notice that delineates individual component fees must accompany the billing or be made readily available in campus electronic and print publications.

A. College Fee

Board of Trustees policy requires collection of the College Fee from all students.  Proceeds from the fee shall be used to supplement campus operations and be recorded into the Revenue Offset Fund at each campus.  Details on the College Fee are outlined in policy document 7800 – College Fee

B. Student Health Services Fee

1. The campus president at each state-operated campus that operates student health services shall establish a health services fee with the approval of the chancellor or designee as outlined in policy document 3752 – Student Health Services.

2. When approved, the fee shall be assessed upon all students enrolled in undergraduate and graduate programs at the campus. A pro-rata portion shall be paid by part-time students. The campus president shall identify categories of students who may be exempted from the fee if their courses of study do not permit access to the student health services available on campus.

3. The mandatory health services fee revenue should be directed to health, counseling and prevention services and related programs. In developing the Student Health Services budget, the campus should consider all revenue sources including student health services fee revenue, state tax support, third party reimbursement and approved charges.

C. Intercollegiate Athletics Fee

1. The Board of Trustees has established a general administrative structure for the operation of a campus Intercollegiate Athletics Program as outlined in policy document 3000 – Intercollegiate Athletics.

2. Revenue in support of the intercollegiate athletics program may be assigned from state appropriations, from private donations, from the student activity fee, from an intercollegiate athletics fee and from funds generated by activities directly related to the intercollegiate athletics program.

3. The Board's establishment of an intercollegiate athletics fee is intended to increase stability in the funding of intercollegiate athletics.

4. Guidelines for establishing an intercollegiate athletics fee:

The request to establish an intercollegiate athletics fee shall be made in two stages by the campus president to the chancellor. The first stage requires the campus president to submit a proposal, which details the consultative process to be utilized on campus and presents the general campus plan that will govern the preparation of the final intercollegiate athletics fee request. The second stage is the submission of the actual results of the consultative process and the official request to establish the fee.

i. Plan for Implementing an Athletics Fee

a. The campus consultative plan submitted to the chancellor for approval shall be broadly based and should include consultation with the intercollegiate athletic board, the campus council, student governance organizations, faculty groups, public hearings and polls.

b. An undergraduate student referendum, conducted in accordance with the plan proposed by the campus president, must be one element of the required consultative process.

ii.    Request to Establish an Athletics Fee

a. The campus president must show evidence of campus support for an intercollegiate athletics fee, based on the results of the approved consultative process, which includes the conduct of a student referendum. The evidence for support will vary by campus, but the request should give special attention to the views of students. No single index of support, either for or against, should be considered controlling.

b. The campus president must specify the initial amount of the fee and its pro rata application to part-time students.

c. The request shall include documentation of the establishment of an intercollegiate athletics board according to University guidelines, along with assurance that all funds derived from the athletic fee will be recorded in and will be expended from an IFR account. The campus president, upon the advice of the intercollegiate athletics board, will approve the intercollegiate athletics budget.

D. Academic Excellence and Success Fee

1. The Board of Trustees authorizes the implementation of an Academic Excellence and Success Fee at the University Centers to provide financial resources necessary for maintaining quality academic and student success programs and to support NYSUNY2020.

2. Revenue may be used to enhance student academic support services, advisement, research opportunities, equipment, facilities, and scholarships.  In addition, funds may be used for personnel service needs such as tutoring, laboratory technicians, faculty and other academic and student support activities. 

3. The Academic Excellence and Success Fee will be assessed to all undergraduate, graduate and first professional degree students at the specific campus. The fee shall be pro-rated for part-time students.

4. The Academic Excellence and Success Fee must be approved by the Chancellor's designee.  Guidelines for fee implementation and the approval process will be included within the annual broad-based fee request which is generally due by April 1st of each year.

E. Technology Fee

1. Campuses are authorized to establish a technology fee as part of a comprehensive funding plan to build and maintain an infrastructure that offers students the highest quality learning environment.

2. Revenue generated from the fee must be used to address specific technology needs such as computing and information technology (i.e., smart classrooms, distance learning offerings, high-speed internet connection), library automation, remote network access, public computing sites and student services automation (i.e., registration, billing), and other administrative systems.

F. Transportation Fee

1. Campuses are authorized to establish a transportation fee to support operation and maintenance of student transportation services on campus and/or between the campus and the surrounding community.

2. Transportation services may take the form of agreements with existing public transportation providers or the operation and maintenance of a campus-controlled system.

3. Revenue in support of transportation services may come from state appropriations, donations, the student activity fee and/or the transportation fee.

G. Other Broad-based Fees

The Chancellor is authorized to approve certain other mandatory student fees which may be considered broad-based fees due to their assessment methodology and mandatory nature.  These other broad-based fees must be approved by the chancellor’s designee and are included with a campuses overall broad-based fee total.  Other broad-based fees may include but are not limited to the per semester transcript fee, recreation center fee, or fitness center fee.

III. Implementation of Board of Trustee Authorized and Broad-Based Fees

A. Defined Fees

Where Board of Trustees resolution has provided a mandatory amount for the fee, no further action is required by the campus in setting the fee amount (e.g., Tuition, Health Insurance for International Exchange Students and Admissions Deposits).

B. Broad-based Fees

All new or increased broad-based fees require the approval of the chancellor’s designee. Prior to the start of the 2012-13 academic year, the university budget office will issue a call letter requesting campuses submit a five-year broad-based fee plan.  Instructions for development of the request will include the current HEPI rate trend, reporting requirements and other relevant information.   

C. Reporting Requirements

In addition to the requirements outlined in the broad-based call letter, campuses are required to submit annually the following information to System Administration (regardless if a request is made to modify the campus fee schedule):

1. Campus broad-based fee policies, including

2. Schedule of all campus fees (broad-based, chancellor and campus approved), including

The fee schedule may be an update to a prior year submission that includes additions, deletions and modifications.

Chancellor Authorized Fees

I. The University Board of Trustees authorized the chancellor or designee to establish a schedule of reasonable fines, fees, deposits and charges in accordance with guidelines issued by the Trustees. The fees established at this level of authority may take two forms.

A. Mandated fees

Mandated fees are fees with set amounts to be assessed by all campuses due to a student’s action or inaction.

1. General Deposits

With the exception of the Residence Hall Damage Deposit, there shall be no general deposits assessed to all students for the purpose of establishing a fund against which to charge for damages or replacement of equipment or facilities.  Assessments for such damage should be made directly against the responsible individual(s) when such damage occurs. 

2. General University Revenue Items

i. Admissions Application Fee

a. Undergraduate Level

1. For applications submitted through the University common application program of the Application Services Center (ASC):

a. An application fee of $50 is required for each choice listed on the application form.

b. The fee is a charge for the processing services of the Application Services Center. Payment of the fee is not contingent on any action or decision a campus may render on an application; or a subsequent decision by an applicant to withdraw an application.

c. Revenue generated from these admissions application activities are subject to revenue sharing with System Administration to support university-wide marketing and enrollment services activities.

d. All applicants are required to pay an application fee EXCEPT:

i. Applicants to the Educational Opportunity Program (EOP) are eligible for up to four free choices.  If a campus determines that such an applicant is not eligible for EOP, the ASC will bill the applicant.

ii. New York State residents transferring directly to a four-year college from a two-year public college in New York State (with an Associate’s degree from the college) are eligible for up to four free choices.

iii. Applicants applying for the last year or last two years of study in a cooperative program (one-plus-one program, dual enrollment programs, 3/2 engineering programs, etc.)

iv. Students not academically eligible for EOP who are economically needy as defined by EOP economic guidelines are eligible for up to four free choices.

2. For applications to undergraduate programs that are not processed through the Application Services Center:

a. An application fee of $50 will be assessed by the campus receiving the application.

b. The fee is a charge for enrollment services.  Payment of the fee is not contingent on any action or decision the campus may render on an application; or subsequent decision by an applicant to withdraw an application.

c. Revenue generated from these admissions application activities are subject to revenue sharing with System Administration as per policy established by the University Provost to support university-wide marketing and enrollment services activities.

3. Re-application to an undergraduate program after a period of separation from the campus:

a. A re-application fee of up to $50 may be charged by an individual campus.

b. The fee is a charge for processing services and/or academic support services provided by the campus to students requesting re-admission.  Payment of the fee is not contingent on any action or decision a campus may render on an application; or subsequent decision by an applicant to withdraw an application.

b. Graduate Level

1. Campuses are required to charge a fee to applicants applying for acceptance into a graduate program leading to a Master’s, Doctoral or equivalent degree.

2. The maximum amount for the graduate application fee is $100, with the campuses granted flexibility to select a rate up to the established maximum.  This flexibility also includes the ability to assign variable graduate application fees based on the academic program.

3. The fee is charged for the services provided by the campus in processing the application.  Payment of the fee is not contingent on any action or a decision a campus may render on an application; or a subsequent decision by an applicant to withdraw an application.

4. All applicants are required to pay an application fee EXCEPT:

a. Applicants who re-apply for admission to the same degree program within one academic year.

b. Applicants who upon admission will be eligible for the Graduate Opportunity Program.  If a campus determines that such an applicant is not eligible for the program, the campus will bill the applicant.

c. Foreign students residing in a country that prohibits the sending of currency with the application.  In most instances, this is viewed as a deferral.  Collection of the fee should be made at the time the student enrolls.

d. Where the campus president or authorized designee believes circumstances justify waiver of the fee.  Documentation supporting the waiver should be maintained by the campus for audit purposes.

5. All graduate level application fee revenue retained by the campus shall support the administrative costs associated with the processing of applications.  Revenue may be recorded in either the revenue offset account or in an Income Fund Reimbursable (IFR) account approved for such purpose.

c. Professional Level

1. Campuses are required to charge a fee to applicants applying for acceptance into a graduate program such as Medicine, Dentistry, Optometry, Pharmacy, Nursing Practice, Physical Therapy, Master of Business Administration and Law.

2. The maximum amount for the professional application fee is $125, with the campuses granted flexibility to select a rate up to the established maximum.  This flexibility also includes the ability to assign variable professional application fees based on the academic program.

3. This fee is charged for the services provided by the campus in processing the application.  Payment of the fee is not contingent on any action or decision a campus may render on an application; or subsequent decision by an applicant to withdraw an application.

4. All applicants are required to pay this fee EXCEPT:

a. Applicants who re-apply for admission to the same program within one academic year.

b. Applicants who upon admission will be eligible for the Graduate Opportunity Program.  If a campus determines that such an applicant is not eligible for the program, the campus will bill the applicant.

c. Foreign students residing in a country that prohibits the sending of currency with the application.  In most instances, this is viewed as a deferral.  Collection of the fee should be made at the time the student enrolls.

d. Where the campus president or authorized designee believes circumstances justify waiver of the fee.  Documentation supporting the waiver should be maintained by the campus for audit purposes.

5. All professional level application fee revenue retained by the campus shall support the administrative costs associated with application processing.  Revenue may be recorded in either the revenue offset account or in an Income Fund Reimbursable (IFR) account approved for such purpose.

ii. Late Registration Fee

a. Campuses are required to define late registration.

b. A fee of up to $50 will be charged for late registration.

c. This fee is subject to waiver in exceptional circumstances; as permitted by the campus president or designee.

d. Fee revenue shall be retained by the campus to support administrative costs associated with processing changes to the student account.  Revenue may be recorded in either the revenue offset account or an Income Fund Reimbursable (IFR) account approved for such purpose.

iii. Drop/Add Fee

a. Campuses are required to define a drop/add period.

b. A $20 fee will be charged for each drop/add transaction occurring after the defined period has ended.

c. This fee is assessed for the additional workload the drop/add activity creates in the registrar, bursar and student account areas.  Revenue may be recorded in either the revenue offset account or in an Income Fund Reimbursable (IFR) account approved for such purpose.

iv. Returned Check Charge

a. Each campus may levy a service charge of $20 for checks that are returned unpaid by the bank against which they are drawn.

b. Revenue may be recorded in either the revenue offset account or in an Income Fund Reimbursable (IFR) account approved for such purpose.

v. Administrative and Late Payment Fees

a. Administrative fees may be assessed for debts where the payment due date was prior to the start of the semester and payment was not received by that date.

b. Late payment fees may be assessed for debts where the payment due date was the start of the semester or after and the payment was not received by that date.  In the case of an item billed after the first full day of the semester, late payment fees may be assessed for outstanding balances not paid in full on or before 30 days after the charge has been placed on the students account.  In the case of a time payment plan, a late payment fee can be assessed for outstanding balances not paid in full on the time payment plan due date.

Debt

Administrative and
Late Payment Fee

Less than $1,000

Up to $30

$1,000 to 1,999.99

Up to $40

$2,000 and above

Up to $50

c. The total fee actions levied for administrative fees and late payment fees combined cannot exceed four actions per semester per account.

d. New York state Finance Law §18 authorizes state agencies to impose interest/late payment and collection fees on past-due debts; however, no debtor of the University may be charged an interest/late payment fee or collection fees by the University or its collection agents without receiving proper notification.  Appendix A is an example of proper notification language under Section 18 of the New York State Finance Law, as provided by the Office of the Attorney General (OAG).  This notification should be included with the billing invoice or notice.

e. Refer to Billings, Refunds, Collection, and Write-offs Policy for Tuition, Fees, and Other Charges, section III - Collection of Delinquent Accounts (Fiscal) for additional information.

f. Revenue may be recorded in either the revenue offset account or in an Income Fund Reimbursable (IFR) account approved for such purpose.

vi. Collection Fee

a. The University may assess collection fee charges in accordance with university policy and fee structure for the cost of processing, handing, and collection of such debt, if payment is not received within 90 days after the first day of the semester, or other appropriate payment due date.

b. A collection fee may be assessed 90 days after the first day of the semester for outstanding balances not paid in full on or before the first day of the semester.   In the case of an item billed after the first day of the semester, a collection fee may be assessed for outstanding balances not paid in full on or before 90 days after the charge has been placed on the students account.  In the case of a missed payment in a time payment plan, a collection fee may be assessed for outstanding balance not paid in full 90 days after the missed payment.

c.  A collection fee may be assessed but must not exceed 22% of the outstanding debt (principal and late payment fee) and must not exceed the estimated cost of processing, handling, and collecting such debt.

d. New York state Finance Law §18 authorizes state agencies to impose interest/late payment and collection fees on past-due debts; however, no debtor of the University may be charged an interest/late payment fee or collection fees by the University or its collection agents without receiving proper notification.  Appendix A is an example of proper notification language under Section 18 of the New York State Finance Law, as provided by the office of the attorney general (OAG).  This notification should be included with the billing invoice or notice.

e. Refer to policy 7301 - Billings, Refunds, Collection, and Write-offs Policy for Tuition, Fees, and Other Charges, section III.  Collection of Delinquent Accounts (Fiscal) for additional information.

f. Revenue from collection fee revenue may be recorded in an IFR account approved for such purpose.

vii. Academic Transcript Fee

a. Campuses have the option to charge on a per transcript basis or to charge all students on a per semester basis.

b. A fee of up to $10 will be charged for each transcript if a per transcript basis is adopted. The transcript fee cap is inclusive of any 3rd party or vendor charges associated with automated or on-line transcript services. 

c. If assessment is on a per semester basis, a cap of up to $10 per semester may be imposed up to a $120 lifetime transcript fee per student.  The academic transcript fee must be reported as a broad-based fee and as such is subject to the University Board of Trustees fee policy governing broad-based fees including student consultation. The chancellor’s designee establishes the semester fee cap.

d. Students enrolled prior to Fall 2011, who were charged for transcripts on a per semester basis are guaranteed unlimited lifetime transcripts.  As of Fall 2011, new students who are charged a transcript fee on a per semester basis will be allowed up to 50 free transcripts per year during the first 3 years after graduation and up to 25 transcripts per year after 3 years.  If a campus elected to charge a per semester fee, and subsequently moves to an automated or 3rd party transcript service, the campus must provide a “free transcript” alternative to students who paid the per semester fee. 

e. Campuses may utilize revenue from the transcript fee to offset the cost of producing and mailing transcripts.  Campuses that collect transcript fees must provide such services at no additional cost to the student.   Revenue may be recorded in either the revenue offset account or in an Income Fund Reimbursable (IFR) account approved for such purpose.

B. Campus Specific Fees

Mandatory campus specific fees that are not covered under the Campus Authorized Fees section below require submission of a request for approval from the chancellor’s designee.  Requests must include documentation and justification of the need for the charges and the disposition of the funds accruing from the fee.  Examples of campus specific fees include but are not limited to:

1. Credit-bearing Academic Course, Instructional Cluster, and Laboratory Fees

i. Reasonable and actual costs may be charged for special course supplies and materials where the student retains an end product from the coursework (i.e., sculpture, ceramics, media portfolios).  A fee may also be charged in courses where a special service is provided (i.e., music instrument rental, private lessons) or that entail extraordinary costs (i.e., dental instrumentation, travel to off-campus sites).

ii. Instructional cluster fees are allowable to fund extraordinary costs associated with degree, diploma or certificate program delivery.  Appropriate items may include costs of maintaining or purchasing specialized equipment, testing fees, clinical and practicum activities, supplies and materials.

iii. Course laboratory fees are permitted to offset the cost of scientific chemicals, supplies and materials, modest equipment and proper disposal of laboratory waste.

iv. Course, cluster and laboratory fees are not permitted to fund the cost of instruction or academic staff and technicians who are performing such duties in conjunction with a credit-bearing or required course leading to a degree, as tuition and State support are provided for such purposes.

v. Fees are not permitted for routine materials, textbooks and items commonly available to students at local merchants or the campus bookstore.  Exceptions are made for proprietary materials, items not available to the general public (i.e., access to testing or learning items, professional grade materials), and certifications.  Fees are permitted for supplies and materials when a significant savings may be realized from volume purchasing.

vi. Course, cluster and laboratory fees, including amounts, must be disclosed in campus publications used by students for degree, course and area of study selection.

2. Administratively Cancelled Registration Fee

i. Campuses may establish a fee to be assessed to students who do not attend classes and fail to appropriately cancel their registration.  The amount of the fee must represent the administrative cost, which can be documented.

ii. The fee is in lieu of the University’s established tuition liability (see policy 7301 - Billings, Refunds, Collection, and Write-offs Policy for Tuition, Fees and Other Charges) only in circumstances where it can be demonstrated that students did not attend any classes or avail themselves of any campus services.

iii. Campuses should attempt to identify as early as possible students who are not in attendance in order to make available these class slots to other students.

iv. Campus publications and billings should give adequate notice of the circumstances for imposition of the fee and the prescribed method for cancelling registration.

v. The fee is to be set at a level commensurate with the administrative costs incurred by the campus in the identification of the students subject to the fee and the de-registration process.  In no case should the fee exceed the tuition liability a student would otherwise be subject to (i.e., part-time student’s credit hour tuition).  Justification for the fee amount must accompany the request to the chancellor’s designee for fee approval.

vi. The fee shall not be made available to the debtor once the OAG has instituted a legal action to collect the debt.  For an account that has been referred to the OAG, the University will not make such an option available to the debtor unless and until the University has confirmed with the OAG that no legal action has been instituted.

3. Course Auditor Fees

a. A registration fee of $50 may be charged to individuals attending courses as auditors.

b. Individuals registered as auditors are subject to penalty fees, such as late registration and library fees and fines.  Auditors are also subject to any required course fees.

c. A registration fee is not to be assessed to course auditors otherwise enrolled as students in the University.

d. For additional information, see policy 7816 – Waiver – Tuition for Course Auditors.

4. Non-Matriculated Student Fee

a. A registration fee of up to $25 may be charged to non-matriculated students for the purpose of registering the student in administrative systems

b. The fee may be charged more than once if a student separates from the campus for a period of more than 18 consecutive months between course registrations.

c. Fees may be used to offset the cost of issuing ID cards to non-matriculated students.

5. International Student Fees

a. Fees may be charged to international students to support immigration and counseling services that are required by the government or provided by the campus.  Such services may include the costs of SEVIS registration and monitoring activities, VISA processing and reporting, and non-teaching and learning counseling services.

b. Revenue may be used to offset the costs of personnel/staff time, supplies and technology required to provide such services to the student.

6. Housing Termination Fee

a. A housing termination fee may be charged to students living on campus who are authorized to break their housing contract.  The fee is designed to fund the costs of processing early terminations and to recover certain fixed costs associated with the residence hall program.

b. Notice of an approved housing termination fee must be provided within the campus housing agreement.

7. Other Campus Specific Fees

Other campus specific fees approved by the chancellor's designee have included but are not limited to:

II. Implementation of Chancellor Authorized Fees

A. Defined Fees

1. Where the procedures provide a mandatory amount, no further action is required by the campus (e.g., undergraduate admissions application fee, late registration fee, drop/add fee, returned check charge, etc).   No further action is required for establishment of graduate and professional application fees or a schedule of administrative and late payment fees but campuses must adhere to the stipulated fee caps, and report the amounts charged to System Administration. 

2. Campuses may request a waiver to exceed the fee cap by submitting such requests to the chancellor’s designee.  This request must contain a rationale for exceeding the cap, comparison of the cost of like services at similar institutions and a revenue versus expenditure analysis for activities supported by the fee.  The Administrative/Late Payment, Returned Check Charge, and Collection Fees are authorized by the NYS Division of Budget and may not be changed.

B. Variable or Campus Specific Fees

For fees, charges and deposits with no specified mandatory amount in policy, the campus is required to request authorization to charge specific amounts.  Requests must include:

1. A description of the fee to be charged.

2. Consistency with fee policy.

3. Any additional relevant or identifying information (i.e., related course name and number).

4. An anticipated revenue versus expenditure budget, showing sufficient detail that justifies the proposed amount being charged.  Fee revenue should be a pass thru of actual expenses related to the activity being supported.

5. The campus policy on refunding fee revenue under certain circumstances (student dropping the course, separation from the institution for health reasons, etc.).

6. The method and reason by which the fees, charges or deposits are to be administered (i.e., through an Income Fund Reimbursable account, Student Association or Auxiliary Services Corporation). 

7. Requests for individual course fees should be submitted by April 1st for the Fall semester and October 1st for the Spring semester.  In all cases requests should be submitted at least a month in advance of when a determination is needed for publishing and billing purposes.

8. Campus requests for authorization of fees, fines, deposits, etc. should be sent to the University Fee Coordinator and/or University Budget Director via e-mail or regular mail at:

  State University of New York
  State University Plaza
  Albany, New York 12246

C. Deposit and Administration of Fee Revenue

Chancellor authorized fees and charges may be funded through an IFR item or by a non-state agency (e.g. Auxiliary Services Corporation) in those instances where the services for which the charge is made are provided by such agency.

Campus Authorized Fees

I. The University Board of Trustees has authorized campus presidents or designees to establish certain charges and fees at the campuses.

Campus Funded Items – Campus Authorized

The following fees and charges may be funded through an IFR item or by a non-state agency (i.e., Auxiliary Services Corporation, Faculty-Student Association) in those instances where the service for which the charge is made is provided by such agency.

1. Residence Hall Room Rates

The University residence halls operate under the Income Fund Reimbursable system, which requires that all operating costs, fringe benefits and debt service costs of the residence halls be funded from income generated through the Residence Hall Income Fund Reimbursable fund. Each campus determines its room rates within university guidelines.  (For additional information, see Residence Hall Operations under IFR Procedures.)

2. Residence Hall Advance Room Deposit

A residence hall advance room deposit may be collected, at a level to be set by each campus to reserve a residence hall room.

i. An advance deposit may be required prior to each semester.

ii. Each campus shall establish a policy and procedure for the refund of advance room deposits.  Such policy must conform to the general guidelines for Residence Hall operations as outlined in policy 7605 – Residence Hall Operations Under IFR Procedures.

3. Residence Hall Damage Deposits

Residence Hall Damage deposits of up to $100 may be required from all university housing residents if there is a reasonable and equitable procedure for assessing individual liability.

i. If required, clear reference to the Residence Hall Damage Deposit must be included in the rental contract.

ii. Funds received from residence hall damage deposits shall be placed in the local depository bank account and transferred to the State University Dormitory Income Fund on a scheduled basis.  In conformance with the University Residence Hall Income Fund procedures, the Residence Hall Damage Deposits Account (No. 900955) will be established to record deposits made for this purpose.

iii. Assessments against residence hall damage deposits shall be transferred from the Residence Hall Damage Deposit Account to a Dormitory Income Fund Reimbursable Account established to provide the necessary allocation for expenses.

iv. Refunds of residence hall deposits shall be paid directly from current balances in the local depository, with a corresponding adjusting entry reflected on the next scheduled transfer of funds to the University Residence Hall Income Fund.

v. The University is not authorized or obligated to pay interest nor is the depositor authorized to require payment of interest on residence hall damage deposits held by the University.

4. Residence Hall Common Area Damage Repair Fees

Campuses are authorized to institute a residence hall common area damage repair fee for all students residing in University housing in accordance with the following guidelines:

i. Common area damages are defined as the costs of repairs or replacements to the physical structure, fixtures, equipment and furnishings of common areas in state-operated residence halls which are reasonably determined to be caused by intentional, willful, malicious or negligent damage or destruction to said facilities, except for wear and tear.

ii. Common areas are defined as all portions of state-operated residence halls generally accessible to the residents of a particular residence hall, exclusive of individual student rooms or suites and such areas as would be further specified by the campus president or designee, in consultation with the appropriate representative group of University housing residents.

iii. The campus president of each state-operated campus operating student residential housing shall determine the amount of such fee, if any, based on the actual costs of repair and replacement that the campus has experienced for common area damage as defined below when the person or persons responsible cannot be identified.

iv. A periodic review shall be conducted by the campus to reassess whether the fee is appropriate and to review the level of the fee. The maximum amount authorized shall not exceed $150.00 per student per academic year.

v. Such fees shall be collected from all students residing in University housing and shall be recorded in the local depository bank account and transferred to the University Residence Hall Income Fund on a scheduled basis in conformance with the State Finance Law. A separate account within the University Residence Hall Income Fund -- DIFR General IFR -- Common Area Damage Repair Account (No. 900956) -- has been established to record the deposit made for this purpose. Accounts within the Fund may be designated by residence hall or other identifiable unit or subunit within each residence hall.

vi. Upon discovering common area damage, the campus president or designee shall initiate an investigation to be made into the cause of the damage by an appropriately representative group of student residents and/or staff and report to him/her within a reasonable time. If the responsible individual(s) cannot be ascertained within a reasonable time, the campus president or designee may charge the appropriate account within the common area damage repair account in an amount sufficient to cover the costs of repair or replacement. Assessments against the common area damage account shall be transferred from the common area damage repair account to a Residence Hall Income Fund Reimbursable Account established to provide the necessary allocation for the expenses of repair and/or replacement.

vii. At the conclusion of the academic year or any designated term therein, the campus shall credit to students continuing in residence housing and refund to students departing from residence housing, their pro-rata shares of any balances remaining in the appropriate accounts. Refunds shall be paid directly from current balances in the local depository with a corresponding adjusting entry reflected on the next scheduled transfer of funds to the University Residence Hall Income Fund.

viii. Campuses have the option of assessing a common area damage fee for common area damage incurred when individuals responsible cannot be identified, in a post-billing process after such students are afforded due process. If the campus employs the post-damage billing methodology, notice describing the fee must be placed in appropriate campus publications and the housing license. An administrative appeal process must be established for students who challenge imposition of the residence hall common area damage repair fee against their account. This post-billing process negates the need for establishment of a residence hall common area damage repair fee and the deposit/refund process described in items c through f above.

5. Residence Hall Telecommunications Charges

Each campus will be responsible for developing an equitable policy for recovering the costs of telecommunication services provided to the students in the residence halls. (For additional information, see Residence Hall Telecommunications Policy.)

6. Board Plans

Board rates are established through the annual budgetary process conducted by the campus administration or campus auxiliary services corporation for the food service operations.

7. Vehicle Registration/Parking Fees and Fines

The Council of each campus is authorized to adopt campus rules and regulations for parking and traffic, including the payment of fees for registration and parking and the assessment of fines for violation of campus regulations.

i. All such rules and regulations shall be submitted to the respective campus president or designee, or if directed by the Board of Trustees, to the Board of Trustees for approval.

ii. Any registration fees and parking fees are further subject to the approval of the campus president or designee, or if directed by the Board of Trustees, by the Board of Trustees.  Approval of fees shall be based upon a determination that the amount of the parking fees is substantially based on an analysis of the costs attributable to the operation and maintenance of the parking facilities owned and operated by the University.

iii. Revenue from registration fees and parking fees or fines shall be recorded in the University Income Fund.  Income Fund Reimbursable accounts shall be established to provide an allocation for expenses.

iv. Campus traffic and parking rules, including the assessment of fines, do not become effective until rulemaking pursuant to the State Administrative Procedure Act culminates in publication in the State Register of the Notice of Adoption.  Campus Counsel is responsible for the rulemaking process.

8. Campus Orientation Program Charges

Reasonable and actual costs for personnel, food and lodging may be charged for both mandatory and optional student orientation programs.  A dedicated orientation program account must be established for program revenue and expenses.  Campus President’s or designees may waive mandatory orientation program costs, as appropriate.

9. Career Service Fees

i. Students

Actual and reasonable costs for supplies and materials may be charged to each student utilizing Career Services.   No charges are to be assessed on students for career service staff, advisement and referral services.

ii. Alumni

Actual and reasonable costs for materials, labor and overhead may be charged to Alumni utilizing Career Services.

10. Library Fees and Fines

Campuses are required to establish a schedule of library charges for overdue and lost material lent to students, faculty, staff and other authorized borrowers.

i. Because of the several types of clientele using the university libraries, it is recommended that each campus form a committee composed of representatives of the various borrowing groups to recommend a library delinquency schedule.  The objective of this committee should be to develop schedules which are both effective and equitable.

ii. Revenue relating to library charges (except lost library material revenue) will be recorded into the University Income Fund – Library Revenue Classification – Number 12825.

iii. Library fee and fine revenue may be utilized for campus use, through an approved account.

11. Non-credit Bearing Instructional Program Fees

Instructional fees for non-credit-bearing instructional programs are to be established at a level to ensure that such programs are demonstrably self-supporting.  The cost of direct expenses, fringe benefits and appropriate overhead expenses are to be offset by income.

12. Clinical Affiliation Malpractice Insurance Coverage

Campuses are authorized to charge the actual cost of clinical affiliation malpractice insurance coverage for students engaged in clinical training programs.

13. Patient/Client Care Charges

Campuses are authorized to establish patient and client-care charges for hospital and clinical services, including non-medical clinics, which are provided as a adjunct to instruction, research or public service and which are appropriate to the campus mission.

14. Voluntary Fees for Selected Student Health Services

Based on the principles and guidelines implemented in conjunction with University policy for the operation of student health services, campuses may establish reasonable charges for selected student health services.  The following may be designated as fee supported services:

15. Equipment Deposits

Campuses may require refundable deposits as bonds against the return of specific items of borrowed equipment.

i. Equipment deposits will be placed in the local depository bank account and transferred to the State University Income Fund on a scheduled basis in conformance with State Finance Law.  A separate account within the State University Income Fund for Equipment Deposits shall be established for this purpose.

ii. Forfeited deposits shall be transferred from the Equipment Deposit account to an Income Fund Reimbursable account established to provide allocation for expenses.

iii. Refunds of Equipment Deposits shall be paid directly from current balances in the local depository, with a corresponding adjusting entry reflected on the next scheduled transfer of funds to the State University Income Fund.

16. Identification Card Replacement Charges

Charges may be levied for replacement of identification cards, not to exceed actual and reasonable costs.

17. Diploma Cover Charges

Actual costs may be charged for diploma covers provided the covers are furnished at the option of the student.  Replacement diplomas and covers may be charged at the actual cost of creating and supplying these documents.

18. Service Charges

Campuses are authorized to establish reasonable charges to students, faculty, staff, and where appropriate on an ancillary basis, to other members of the public for access to campus services or facilities available on the campus but not normally or usually provided as part of the campuses’ relationship to a student during instruction nor to an employee in the course of employment.  Campuses are to assure they do not enter into direct and/or unfair competition with private business, that such services are a natural and immediate extension of existing services or facility usage, and that the primary purpose of such activity is to serve students, faculty and staff.  Such services many include but are not limited to:

19. Entrance/Attendance Fees

Campuses may establish reasonable charges for entrance to or attendance at:

20. Sponsoring Agency Charges

Campuses are authorized to establish charges for campus services or facilities provided to sponsoring agencies for grants, contracts and other sponsored activities.

21. Internal Campus Charges

Campuses may establish reasonable charges for services provided by one campus unit to another campus unit.

II. Implementation of Campus Authorized Fees

Fees designated as campus authorized may be established with the approval of the campus president and do not require prior approval of the chancellor’s designee. Campuses may request a waiver to exceed the fee cap by submitting a request to the chancellor’s designee.  This request must contain a rationale for the increased cap, comparison of the cost of like services at similar institutions and revenue versus expenditure analysis for activities supported by the fee.

Schedules of campus authorized fees are to be maintained by each campus and provided to system administration annually upon request.  Such schedules of charges are subject to modification by the chancellor’s designee and governed by the University policies and guidelines.


Definitions

There are no definitions relevant to this policy.


Other Related Information

Award of Academic Credit by Evaluation

College Fee

Deposits - Pre-admissions - Graduate Program

Pre-Admission Deposits - Undergraduate Program

Intercollegiate Athletics

Student Activity Fees - Mandatory

Student Health Services

Tuition, Fees, and Other Charges - Definitions

Tuition Schedule

Waiver - Tuition for Course Auditors

Educational Opportunity Program

Division of the Budget, Budget Policy and Reporting Manual - Guidelines for Accounts Receivable Management and Collection - Section K-034

Memorandum of Understanding between the Office of the Attorney General and the State University of New York, July 27, 2004.


Procedures

Health Insurance Coverage for International Exchange, Research & Study Programs

Intercollegiate Athletics, Fiscal & Accounting Procedures

Student Activity Fee Programs - Mandatory, Fiscal and Accounting Procedures for


Forms

There are no forms relevant to this policy.


Authority

The following links to FindLaw's New York State Laws are provided for users' convenience; it is not the official site for the State of New York laws. 

Education Law §360 (Powers to regulate traffic on university grounds)

New York State Finance Law §18 (Interest and collection fees assessed on debts owed to the state)

State Administrative Procedure Act

In case of questions, readers are advised to refer to the New York State Legislature site for the menu of New York State Consolidated.

Tuition, Fees and Charges (8 NYCRR 302)

Board of Trustees Policies Vehicle and Pedestrian Traffic-Parking Regulations (8 NYCRR Part 560)

Chapter 55 of the NYS Laws of 1992


History

State University of New York Board of Trustees Resolution [pending], adopted September 20, 2011.

Amended – July 1, 2010; Policy revised to reflect increase in undergraduate application fee from $40 to $50.

Amended – July 1, 2005; Policy revised to include guidance on Collections, Administrative and Late Payment fees.

Amended – December 12, 2003; Policy revised to set authority and amounts for graduate and professional application fees; transcripts fees; residence hall common area damage fees; late payment fees; drop/add fees; late registration; orientation; library fees/fines; course auditing and administratively cancelled registration fees as authorized by Board of Trustees Resolution 01-19. 

State University of New York Board of Trustees Resolution 01-19, adopted June 19, 2001 requires campuses to adopt procedures to include student consultation in broad-based fee decision-making, adequate communication of fee actions, circumstances for fee waivers and refunds, and address fee issues of part-time/non-traditional and off-site students. Resolution provided authority for campuses to establish reasonable user fees, charges, and fines for violation of institutional regulations.

State University of New York Board of Trustees Resolution 01-12, adopted January 23, 2001 delegated authority to campus President to approve traffic and parking rules.

State University of New York Board of Trustees Resolution 98-86, adopted June 22, 1998 removed the ceiling on Inter-collegiate Athletic fees at state-operated campuses.

State University of New York Board of Trustees Resolution 96-172, adopted October 24, 1996 established mandatory health service program for full-time students.

State University of New York Board of Trustees Resolution 96-171, adopted October 24, 1996 amended the ceiling on Inter-collegiate Athletic fees at state-operated campuses.

State University of New York Board of Trustees Resolution 93-263, adopted December 14, 1993 amended the Inter-collegiate Athletic and mandatory Student Health fees at state-operated campuses.

State University of New York Board of Trustees Resolution 91-97, adopted June 13, 1991 amended SUNY regulations 302.1 (Tuition and Charges).

State University of New York Board of Trustees Resolution 91-15, adopted January 23, 1991 established mandatory Student Health fee at state-operated campuses.

State University of New York Board of Trustees Resolution 90-156, adopted September 27, 1990 authorized the implementation of Student Health Service committee recommendations.

State University of New York Board of Trustees Resolution 90-14, adopted January 22, 1990 amended SUNY regulations 560 (Vehicle and Pedestrian Traffic and Parking Regulations).

State University of New York Board of Trustees Resolution 89-151, adopted August 2, 1989 authorized the chancellor to promulgate guidelines for parking fee program at state operated campuses.

State University of New York Board of Trustees Resolution 88-219, adopted October 25, 1988 amended the Tuition and Fee schedule.

State University of New York Board of Trustees Resolution 88-79, adopted May 24, 1988 authorized the establishment of Inter-collegiate Athletic fee.

State University of New York Board of Trustees Resolution 86-104, adopted May 27, 1986 authorized upgrade of budget for Inter-collegiate Athletics.

State University of New York Board of Trustees Resolution 85-150, adopted June 25, 1985 requires that health insurance coverage be consistent with federal requirements and the cost of such insurance be borne by participants through the imposition of a mandatory fee.

State University of New York Board of Trustees Resolution 84-107, adopted May 22, 1984 authorized the chancellor to promulgate guidelines governing the for establishment of a residence hall common area damage fee.

State University of New York Board of Trustees Resolution 81-18, adopted February 11, 1981 authorized the chancellor to revise tuition and fee schedule for 1981-82.

State University of New York Board of Trustees Resolution 72-186, adopted August 17, 1972 approved the Traffic and Parking regulations.

State University of New York Board of Trustees Resolution 71-188, adopted June 30, 1971 authorized the chancellor to increase the Admission Application fee.


Appendices

Example of Section 18 Notification Language