SUNY Vice Presidents for Research
SUNY Vice Presidents for Research

SUNY Vice Presidents for Research

Vice Presidents for Research oversee all aspects of research on their campuses.  As a group, they collaborate on research projects and meet regularly to discuss research and innovation activities at their campuses to share information and best practices.

Doctoral Campuses

David Amberg

David C. Amberg 
Upstate Medical University

David Amberg received his B.A. in Biology/Chemistry from Whitman College in 1983 graduating cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa. After a brief stint in Biotech at Immunex Corporation in Seattle he pursued his Ph.D. at Dartmouth Medical School in Biochemistry graduating in 1992. The title of his PhD thesis was “Isolation and characterization of essential genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae required for the efficient nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of mRNA.”

Dr. Amberg then moved to Stanford School of Medicine where he was mentored by David Botstein then Chair of the Department of Genetics. His post-doctoral work focused on structure/function studies of novel actin binding proteins. His work on the cytoskeleton continued in his own lab when he moved to SUNY Upstate Medical University (SUNY UMU) in 1996 where he has been promoted through the ranks to Professor in 2008.

In 2004 he received the President’s Award for Excellence in Teaching, in 2009 he was named Jacobsen Scholar at SUNY UMU, in 2011 he received the President’s Award for Excellence and Leadership in Research, and in 2012 the Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Scholarship and Creative Activities. His administrative service at SUNY UMU has included serving as the Associate Vice President of Research Integrity, the Research Integrity Officer, Research Conflict of Interest Officer and most recently he was named Interim Vice President of Research in July of 2014.

Stewart Bloomfield

Stewart Bloomfield
SUNY College of Optometry

Dr. Bloomfield brings more than 30 years of experience in research and graduate education to the College and an outstanding record of internationally recognized research on retinal neurophysiology. The NIH (National Institutes of Health), through the NEI (National Eye Institute), has continuously funded his research on retinal amacrine cell function since 1988, as well as other grants from NIH and NSF (National Science Foundation).

James Dias

James Dias
University at Albany

James Dias serves as Vice President for Research. His academic affiliation is with the Department of Biomedical Sciences in the School of Public Health, where he served as Chair. His previous work experience includes being a member of the Department of Biochemistry in the Albany Medical College from 1981-1988; a research scientist with the Wadsworth Center of the New York State Department of Health; scientific director of the Wadsworth Center’s scientific core facilities; and service on national trade journals, study sections and external advisory panels.

Professor Dias received his B.S degree in biology from the Gonzaga University and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in reproductive physiology, with the subspecialty of animal science, from Washington State University. He was the recipient of several NIH career development awards, including an individual National Research Service Award, a New Investigator Award and a Research Career Development Award (1985). He has published more than 100 research articles on the reproductive hormones which control high quality gametogenesis and has been funded by the National Institutes of Health for 20 years.

Venu Govindaraju

Venu Govindaraju
University at Buffalo

Dr. Venu Govindaraju, SUNY Distinguished Professor of Computer Science and Engineering, is the founding director of the Center for Unified Biometrics and Sensors. He received his Bachelor's degree with honors from the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) in 1986, and his Ph.D. from UB in 1992. His research focus is on machine learning and pattern recognition in the domains of Document Image Analysis and Biometrics.

Dr. Govindaraju has co-authored about 400 refereed scientific papers. His seminal work in handwriting recognition was at the core of the first handwritten address interpretation system used by the US Postal Service. He was also the prime technical lead responsible for technology transfer to the Postal Services in US, Australia, and UK. He has been a Principal or Co-Investigator of sponsored projects funded for about 65 million dollars. Dr. Govindaraju has supervised the dissertations of 30 doctoral students. He has served on the editorial boards of premier journals such as the IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence and is currently the Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Biometrics Council Compendium.

Dr. Govindaraju is a Fellow of the ACM (Association of Computing Machinery), IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers), AAAS (American Association for the Advancement of Science), the IAPR (International Association of Pattern Recognition), and the SPIE (International Society of Optics and Photonics). He is recipient of the 2004 MIT Global Indus Technovator award and the 2010 IEEE Technical Achievement award.

Michael Liehr

Michael Liehr
SUNY Polytechnic Institute

As CNSE Executive Vice President of Innovation and Technology, Michael Liehr focuses on the creation of new business opportunities, develops and manages pertinent administrative and infrastructure operations required to support their establishment, and manages integrated industry-university consortia and public-private partnerships. He is also responsible for the effective and efficient operation of the CNSE core strategic semiconductor and packaging partnership engagements, including the IBM, GLOBALFOUNDRIES, AMAT, TEL, and LAM partnerships. Dr. Liehr is also Vice President for Research at CNSE, responsible for strategic research and development for nanoelectronics and 3D packaging alliances at CNSE.

In a previous assignment at CNSE, Dr. Liehr served as General Manager of the Global 450mm Consortium (G450C), where he coordinated the industry-first effort by consortium members Intel, IBM, Samsung, TSMC, GLOBALFOUNDRIES and the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) to make available production-grade 450mm processing equipment.

Prior to joining CNSE, Dr. Liehr served as an IBM executive responsible for Worldwide Semiconductor Manufacturing Strategic Production Alliances for leading-edge semiconductor products. While at IBM, he was responsible for technology transfer, operations and supply management for outsourced semiconductor production of IBM's 90nm, 65nm and 45nm semiconductor-on-insulator (SOI)-based microprocessor technologies to Chartered Semiconductor Manufacturing in Singapore. In addition, he oversaw management of fabricator synchronization for bulk CMOS 65nm through 32nm with Chartered, Singapore; Samsung, Korea; and ST Microelectronics, France. His experience spans research, product and process development, manufacturing, and semiconductor foundry business P&L.

Dr. Liehr holds a Ph.D. in Physics, is a certified executive project manager, and has authored or co­authored 20 patents and over 90 publications.

Chris Nomura 
SUNY ESF

Dr. Christopher T. Nomura is the VPR and a professor in the Department of Chemistry at the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry (SUNY-ESF), a member of the SUNY-ESF Center for Applied Microbiology, Syracuse Biomaterials Institute and Chutian Visiting Lecturer at Hubei University in Wuhan, China.  He received his BA in Biology with honors from the University of California at Santa Cruz, where he studied immunology and physiology of elephant seals, and his Ph.D. in Biochemistry, Microbiology, and Molecular Biology at The Pennsylvania State University for his research on cyanobacterial electron transport proteins.  From 2001 to 2006, he worked in the internationally recognized Natural Polymer Chemistry laboratory of Dr. Yoshiharu Doi at the RIKEN Institute in Japan.  Since 2006, he has been a faculty member in the Department of Chemistry at SUNY-ESF.  Dr. Nomura has published and co-authored more than 50 original articles in refereed scientific journals, including 3 reviews, 7 book chapters, and 5 patent disclosures.  Dr. Nomura has a multi-disciplinary research group whose interests span the fields of metabolic engineering, protein engineering, microbial physiology, molecular microbiology, biochemistry, synthetic chemistry, and polymer chemistry.  He received the SUNY-ESF Exemplary Researcher Award in 2011 for his contributions to the field of biopolymer production and has received special recognition for his mentorship of student researchers.  Dr. Nomura’s research programs have been sponsored by DOE, USDA, NIH, NSF, and NYSERDA. 

Richard Reeder

Richard Reeder
Stony Brook University

Professor Reeder's research encompasses geochemistry and mineralogy, with focuses on environmental contamination, materials properties, and links to environmental health.  Major goals of this work are to understand geochemically and environmentally important reaction mechanisms, especially those involving metal species, interactions at mineral surfaces, and bioavailability. Reeder's group makes extensive use of synchrotron X-ray facilities at nearby Brookhaven National Laboratory and at Argonne National Laboratory for studying metal speciation in sediments, soils, and aquatic systems, as well as structural properties of biomaterials and transformations in minerals.

Bahghat Sammakia

Bahgat Sammakia
SUNY Polytechnic Institute

On November 3, 2016, Dr. Sammakia was appointed SUNY Poly Interim President by the SUNY Borad of Trustees.

Previously at Binghamton University, Bahgat Sammakia was the vice president for research and a distinguished professor of mechanical engineering. A former IBM senior technical staff member, Sammakia joined Binghamton's faculty in 1998. He is the founding director of the Small Scale Systems Integration and Packaging Center, a New York State Center of Excellence, and is the director of the Energy Efficient Electronic Systems Center, an NSF IUCRC founded in 2011 with a focus on reducing the energy consumed by data centers around the world. Sammakia earned his bachelor’s degree from the University of Alexandria in Egypt and his master’s and doctoral degrees from the University at Buffalo. He is a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and a senior IEEE member. Sammakia, editor of the ASME Journal of Electronic Packaging, holds 14 U.S. patents and has published more than 180 peer-reviewed technical papers.

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